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Welcome to Las Vegas Investments & Realty

Las Vegas Investments & is a full-service commercial and residential real estate brokerage with a dedicated focus in Las Vegas and surrounding communities. As an experienced and diverse company our services include assisting our clients in: Listing & Selling Purchasing Leasing Short sales Investment consulting Foreclosures & REO’s If you are interested in obtaining more information about these services contact us immediately at 702-331-2800 or fill out your info on our contact page.

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How to Do Real Estate Investment Right

For most people, their home is their biggest asset, particularly after they’ve owned it for a decade or more and have paid down their home loan to build equity. Of course, most people also appreciate the inherent value of living in a place they own and love.

From an investment point of view, your primary residence not only builds in value over time, it also provides you with a tax benefit when you write off your mortgage interest payments on your taxes. In addition, you receive protection (up to $250,000 or $500,000 if you’re married) from capital gains taxes when you sell it.

If your home has increased in value over time, you may be thinking you’d like to own more real estate. If so, you can look into purchasing a second home or vacation home for yourself—or purchasing a property you intend to sell or rent.

Vacation Home Purchasing as Real Estate Investment

A second home you use for vacations can be treated the same way as your primary residence, with your mortgage interest payments tax deductible, but typically you’ll need to make a down payment of at least 20% to 25%—and you must have good credit along with the income to handle the additional mortgage payments.

If you opt to rent out your home for more than 14 days a year, the property will be considered an investment property and the tax treatment changes. You’ll only be able to deduct the expenses considered part of the investment—such as mortgage interest and maintenance or repair costs—proportional to the number of days the property is rented.

A vacation home can be an excellent investment both for your quality of life—but also as a future retirement home or an asset to earn income or to sell when you retire.

Buy and Flip or Buy and Rent?

If you’re more interested in owning real estate for purely investment purposes, you’ll need to think carefully about how much time and money you want to put into a real estate investment.

You should work with a REALTOR® who invests in property and knows about your local market, but you also should educate yourself about your current market conditions. Ideally, you should buy when prices are low and sell when prices are high, but market timing can be difficult.

Some investors opt to buy property that needs repair, do the work and then sell it within a short time period (“flip”). Whether that works for you depends on whether you can do some of the work yourself or have reliable contractors available.

In addition, you need to be fairly certain you find a property at the right price and then find a buyer willing to pay enough so you make a profit beyond the money you put into it. You should have funds available for a down payment of 20% to 25%, good credit, and funds for the repair work—as well as to make the payments until the property sells.

Many real estate investors prefer to buy a home and rent it, but you need to be prepared for the possibility your property could remain empty in between renters. You’re also responsible for all maintenance and repairs, so you need to be prepared financially and emotionally for that commitment. You need to educate yourself about home prices in your area—but also about rental rates and demand to see if you can keep the property rented at a rate to cover your mortgage payments (or most of it).

Acquiring and managing a real estate investment requires a team of professionals including a REALTOR®, a tax advisor and good contractors you can rely on to renovate or repair a property to keep it attractive for renters or buyers.

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In Love With Two Houses?

 

What to consider when making the final decision

 By Michele Dawson
As you find yourself heavily immersed in house-hunting mode, you may encounter a situation in which you’re torn between two houses. Perhaps you and your spouse each have a favorite, or perhaps you both like two houses equally – or think you do.

Making a final decision and determining which house to make an offer on shouldn’t be taken lightly. The decision should be made rationally and not guided by emotion.
Of course, you may not have the luxury of taking your time on deciding which house you’d like to pursue. You may be in a market in which homes in your price range get snatched up as quickly as they go on the market, perhaps even attracting multiple offers.
But in some situations, you may find yourself torn between two houses. Sometimes the easiest thing to do is take pen to paper and outline your family’s needs, your budget, and the pros and cons of each house.
Some things you’ll want to compare include:
  • The neighborhoods. If the two final contenders are in different neighborhoods, evaluate the pros and cons. If you have kids and being close to a park is important, you’ll want to consider that. How close are shopping, restaurants, church, and other services? Are the streets maintained? Do homeowners landscape and maintain their homes nicely? How long will your commute to work be?
  • The schools. If you have school-aged children, you definitely want to consider the reputation of the neighborhood schools. You can usually find general district information and state standardized test results online. But once you’re this deep in the process, you’ll want to visit the schools and receive the information first-hand from school officials. You should also talk to teachers and parents.
  • Crime. Go to the local police or sheriff department and ask about crime in your specific neighborhood. You might find theft or vandalism to be more prevalent in one area than another.
  • The houses compared to others in the neighborhood. While it may boost your self-esteem to have the biggest house on the block, it’s typically a better idea to stay away from purchasing the neighborhood monster. When it comes time to sell you’ll find that the lower value of your neighbors’ homes will shrink your home’s value.
  • Appreciation. If the two homes you’re eyeing are in different parts of town or different neighborhoods, ask your real estate agent to retrieve sales of homes in those neighborhoods over the past few years. If one neighborhood shows an annual average 8 percent increase and another is skyrocketing at 15 percent, you may have your decision made.
  • The sellers’ situations. If you don’t know already, ask your real estate agent how long each home has been on the market. Usually the longer a house has been listed, the better chance the seller will accept an offer lower than asking price. Conversely, if the house has been on the market for just a couple days, the sellers will probably wait for a better offer if you offer less than the listed price. Your real estate agent might also be able to dig up additional information about the sellers, like why they’re selling. If it’s a job-related move or a divorce, the sellers likely want to move as quickly as possible, meaning you have a better shot at them accepting a lower price.
  • The houses themselves. If you haven’t already, you should make a list of the amenities and attributes you want your house to have. If you want that first-floor home office, a large, open back yard for the kids, or a gourmet kitchen, be sure to include that on your list. Then, rate how each house measures up to each need on your list.
  • Drawbacks. Likewise, make a list of the cons associated with each house and determine how much of a negative impact each will have.
As you carefully weigh all the factors, it might become clear that one house is more enticing than the other. Or, you may find the houses are still equally appealing. If that is the case, be sure you look at the homes more than once. You may notice something you didn’t the first time around – something that could sway you one way or the other.
In fact, you should probably visit each home at least two more times, at different times of the day to get a feeling for how the house and neighborhood look and feel in the morning versus late afternoon or evening. Once you make a decision and an offer, you can take comfort in knowing you may still have a back-up if the deal falls apart.
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Think Color in 2014

Gray is the new black; reclaimed wood and porcelain floors are made for walkin’; and wireless is controlling sound, window shades, TV, and more. This is a look at the 10 hottest home design trends anticipated for the new year.
DECEMBER 2013 | BY BARBARA BALLINGER

Whether it’s based on fashion, the economy, new technologies, or the overall mood of the country, home design trends come and go — sometimes slowly and sometimes lickety-split. But as with apparel, some trends become classics and remain strong — a Barcelona chair, for instance — while others go out the window (think avocado and harvest gold kitchen appliances).

The best advice you can give recent buyers or soon-to-be sellers is not to copy any trend blindly, especially if it doesn’t work with their budget, decor, personal preference, or lifestyle. It’s smart for your clients to be more cautious with expensive, permanent parts of their home environment, but more daring with easy-to-switch dishes, wall paint, and pillows.

Here are 10 trends that are coming on big in 2014:

1. Wider, reclaimed wood and wood-like porcelain floors. Wood floorboards are getting wider—often up to 5 and 6 inches, stained warm gray, and cut from several tree species, says designer Jennifer Adams, principal of Jennifer Adams Design Group in Portland, Ore. Adams is also seeing less of the hand-scraped look, which was costly to produce. Yet, boards can be personalized in other ways. Bole Floor uses a technique that gives floorboards a natural-looking curve, which also allows for more boards from each tree. Other companies like Maine Heritage Timberrecycle logs from older trees, which adds warm patina. Architect Elissa Morgante of Morgante-Wilson Architects in Chicago, has found that these reclaimed boards can look smashing whether in traditional or contemporary settings. Porcelain flooring has become more popular, too, because it’s indestructible and available in unlimited styles, sizes, and colors, says designer Steven Gurowitz of Interiors by Steven G.

2. Simpler cabinets, bigger drawers. A major shift is occurring in kitchen cabinets: Warmer gray tones are replacing oranges and browns for a more authentic look, says Andy Wells, vice president of product design at MasterBrand Cabinets. Styles also have shifted from traditional and detailed to more transitional and mid-century modern, since cleaner designs tend to give a kitchen a more timeless look. To fit these styles, hardware is less visible, more modern, and sometimes integrated into the doors. Instead of lower cabinets, big drawers are favored because they’re easier to access and can be fitted with removable storage receptacles.

3. Paint palettes. After years of beiges and whites grabbing all the attention as a way to appeal to potential buyers, many home owners now opting for more varied colors. Color forecasters agree that gray, especially a warmer hue, is the “it” gal in home design for 2014. Mary Lawlor, manager of color marketing for Kelly-Moore Paints, says overall look is lighter, fresher soft corals, shell colors, sea greens, lavenders, and misty blues — sometimes mixed with more potent purples and metallics. She also sees a decrease in Tuscan palettes. Sara McClean, who works with Dunn-Edwards, projects neon brights fading or being mellowed, and expects blues to be everywhere. Jackie Jordan, director of color marketing for Sherwin-Williams, says four color palettes are emerging: black, white, and gray layered with textures and warm woods; soft flesh tones, beiges, grays, and off-whites; deeper romantic hues, like purple, teal, red, and some oxided golds and coppers; and globally inspired, ethnic brights balanced by neutrals.

4. Indoor-outdoor living. The trend for indoor and outdoor spaces to blend seamlessly continues with more rooms having multiple sets of French doors that open to the outside, as well as big windows that bring in the outdoors visually. Solariums with screens for fresh air in summer, and screened or covered porches that link a house with patio and pool are also coveted home features, says Jeffrey Colle, whose firm designs and builds homes throughout the Hamptons. Even freestanding outdoor structures are being spiffed up. Pool houses may feature more than changing rooms and bathrooms; some owners are adding cooking equipment, fireplaces, and terraces with living room-style seating, wireless sound systems, and weather-protected TVs. Also expect more pizza ovens, fireplaces, fire pits, and propane heaters to extend use.

5. Kitchen color, energy efficiency, and new materials. Several trends are changing up the look of the kitchen, the room where everyone still wants to hang out:

  • After years of playing it safe in color in appliances, some home owners are willing to go boldBertazzoni is manufacturing its professional-style ranges in “vitamin” colors of red, yellow, and an orange it calls Arancio.
  • Bertazzoni, Thermador, and other companies are making their ranges eco-friendly, energy efficient, and more about healthy cooking with new steam oven models.
  • Smaller is in when home owners downsize. Bertazzoni’s range is available in a 30-inch version.
  • Instead of giving up valuable space for a desk, home owners are shifting more toward smaller work areas that allow them to recharge phones, tablets, and other portable devices, as well as a place to leave their mail and keys, says designer Jennifer Gilmer.
  • New materials are replacing standard-bearers. One example: After years of seeing granite top so many counters, metals are coming on strong, such as hot rolled steel, says Gilmer.
  • The mismatched, unfitted look is disappearing, replaced by cabinets that fit together more like a jigsaw puzzle and reflect a cleaner, tidier look, says Morgante.

6. Bathroom kudos. Bathrooms continue to become more luxurious, says Deb Dumel, showroom manager of the Frank Webb Bath Center in Boston. She sees several trends coming on stronger in 2014:

  • TVs integrated into medicine cabinets to avoid having a separate TV visible all the time, such as a sleek one from Robern.
  • Bigger steam showers—sometimes 7 feet by 4 feet—equipped with built-in speakers, an iPad docking station, Bluetooth connectivity, and aromatherapy. Gone are the panoply of jets and sprays that made some showers resemble a human car wash, Dumel says. In their place may be dual controls for two to shower at once with different temperatures. Also popular are rain heads that provide a softer, but still drenching, spray rather than the sharp needle effect. Infinity drains that run the length of a shower floor eliminate curb designs.
  • For men who don’t want to worry about fogging up a mirror when shaving, there are more antifogging devices available.
  • Washlets can now introduce greater comfort and cleanliness with an integrated, self-cleaning nozzle that releases a warm, soothing stream of aerated water; many also have a heating device and deodorizer.
  • Though many do without a tub or a whirlpool, others want the option if there’s room and funds in the budget. Freestanding models are favored.

 

7. Technology wow. As you can see with all aspects of home design, technology systems are being integrated more and more, at all price ranges and complexities. From heat to lighting, security to sound and entertainment, and windows and window treatments to doors, technology is a home owner’s friend whether they are home or away. Spurring this trend is less costly wireless technology, sometimes one-and-a-half times less than hard wiring, says Eric Thies, founder and director of marketing for VIA International. At the high end, he sees home owners adding digital backsplashes with displays to watch TV or cycle through digital files of kids’ artwork or family photos. Many home owners are beefing up their networks to business-grade levels. To be extra safe, Morgante says those who have wireless may want hard wiring to ensure sure they don’t lose connections.

8. Global style. The shrinking world means more ethnic fabrics and handcrafted artworks mixed into traditional, transitional, and modern spaces. African and Asian pieces will be particularly popular, along with more embroidered fabrics, says designer Heidi Rawson, based in Scottsdale, Ariz. Kimba Hills, owner of Rumba Style in Santa Monica, Calif., is using Turkish rugs overdyed with bright and subdued tones. “The rugs bring great color and warmth. They’re more contemporary and edgier than their traditional counterparts,” Hills says.

9. Personalized quality. After years of tight budgets, there’s a return to quality as consumers spend more on choice pieces. Designer Claudia Juestel of Adeeni Design Group in San Francisco searches for artisans who fashion bespoke pieces to create one-of-a-kind interiors. The designs she and others favor incorporate craftsmanship and time-honored materials while utilizing modern technology, too. Some examples of her favorite artisans: Paul Benson for metal furnishings and accessories; Kyle Bunting for decorative hide rugs; Michael Coffey for sculptural furnishings; and The Alpha Workshops for a wide variety of unique products.

10. Accent chairs. While big comfortable sofas are always the go-to seating in most rooms, accent chairs for an extra perch and pop of color are coming on strong, says Kristen Pawlak, with Decorating Den in Louisville, Ky. “They’re small, affordable, and a way to add an accent for little cost. They also can introduce a new style to a room. Just be sure to keep it in the same scale as other furnishings,” Pawlak says

Published in Realtor Mag December

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Why You Should Work With a REALTOR®

Not all real estate practitioners are REALTORS®. The term REALTOR® is a registered trademark that identifies a real estate professional who is a member of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION of REALTORS® and subscribes to its strict Code of Ethics. Here are five reasons why it pays to work with a REALTOR®.

  1. You’ll have an expert to guide you through the process. Buying or selling a home usually requires disclosure forms, inspection reports, mortgage documents, insurance policies, deeds, and multi-page settlement statements. A knowledgeable expert will help you prepare the best deal, and avoid delays or costly mistakes.
  2. Get objective information and opinions. REALTORS® can provide local community information on utilities, zoning, schools, and more. They’ll also be able to provide objective information about each property. A professional will be able to help you answer these two important questions: Will the property provide the environment I want for a home or investment? Second, will the property have resale value when I am ready to sell?
  3. Find the best property out there. Sometimes the property you are seeking is available but not actively advertised in the market, and it will take some investigation by your REALTOR® to find all available properties.
  4. Benefit from their negotiating experience. There are many negotiating factors, including but not limited to price, financing, terms, date of possession, and inclusion or exclusion of repairs, furnishings, or equipment. In addition, the purchase agreement should provide a period of time for you to complete appropriate inspections and investigations of the property before you are bound to complete the purchase. Your agent can advise you as to which investigations and inspections are recommended or required.
  5. Property marketing power. Real estate doesn’t sell due to advertising alone. In fact, a large share of real estate sales comes as the result of a practitioner’s contacts through previous clients, referrals, friends, and family. When a property is marketed with the help of a REALTOR®, you do not have to allow strangers into your home. Your REALTOR® will generally prescreen and accompany qualified prospects through your property.
  6. Real estate has its own language. If you don’t know a CMA from a PUD, you can understand why it’s important to work with a professional who is immersed in the industry and knows the real estate language.
  7. REALTORS® have done it before. Most people buy and sell only a few homes in a lifetime, usually with quite a few years in between each purchase. And even if you’ve done it before, laws and regulations change. REALTORS®, on the other hand, handle hundreds of real estate transactions over the course of their career. Having an expert on your side is critical.
  8. Buying and selling is emotional. A home often symbolizes family, rest, and security — it’s not just four walls and a roof. Because of this, home buying and selling can be an emotional undertaking. And for most people, a home is the biggest purchase they’ll ever make. Having a concerned, but objective, third party helps you stay focused on both the emotional and financial issues most important to you.
  9. Ethical treatment. Every member of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION of REALTORS® makes a commitment to adhere to a strict Code of Ethics, which is based on professionalism and protection of the public. As a customer of a REALTOR®, you can expect honest and ethical treatment in all transaction-related matters. It is mandatory for REALTORS® to take the Code of Ethics orientation and they are also required to complete a refresher course every four years.     Published by Realtor Mag
  10. Published by Realtor Mag
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Just Sold for Full List Price

7817 Blesbok Las Vegas, NV 89166  was an equity sale that sold for full list in under a month.  Seller are moving on to a new phase in their life and excited about the services rendered!